Spicy Duck Tacos
 
Serves 4
Total time 25 minutes
 
 
1 Muscovy duck breast
Kosher Salt
Fresh ground black pepper
4 Sprouted corn tortillas
½ cup 0% greek yogurt
2 Tsp rocoto Peruvian chili sauce
1 lime juiced plus the zest
½ red onion sliced thin
1 radish, julienned fine
½  cup cilantro leaves
 
 
Trim any excess fat and remove the underside tendon and any silver skin. Score the fat in a crosshatch pattern and season liberally with salt and fresh ground black pepper.
 
Place a large skillet over the burner and slide the duck into the cold pan. Turn the heat to medium low and gently render the fat, pouring it into a jar as you go (do not dare waste it) It takes about 10-15 minutes to fully render the fat.
 
Meanwhile whisk together the yogurt, chili sauce, lime juice, zest and a pinch of salt and set aside.
 
Once the skin is crispy flip the duck and cook on the flesh side for about a minute. It should feel like the fleshy part of the inside of your hand when cooked to medium rare.
 
Remove the meat from the pan and allow to rest on a cutting board for about 3-5 minutes. 
 
Slice thinly and divide among the taco shells along with the spicy yogurt sauce, onion radish and cilantro 
 

 
ZoomInfo

Spicy Duck Tacos

 

Serves 4

Total time 25 minutes

 

 

1 Muscovy duck breast

Kosher Salt

Fresh ground black pepper

4 Sprouted corn tortillas

½ cup 0% greek yogurt

2 Tsp rocoto Peruvian chili sauce

1 lime juiced plus the zest

½ red onion sliced thin

1 radish, julienned fine

½  cup cilantro leaves

 

 

Trim any excess fat and remove the underside tendon and any silver skin. Score the fat in a crosshatch pattern and season liberally with salt and fresh ground black pepper.

 

Place a large skillet over the burner and slide the duck into the cold pan. Turn the heat to medium low and gently render the fat, pouring it into a jar as you go (do not dare waste it) It takes about 10-15 minutes to fully render the fat.

 

Meanwhile whisk together the yogurt, chili sauce, lime juice, zest and a pinch of salt and set aside.

 

Once the skin is crispy flip the duck and cook on the flesh side for about a minute. It should feel like the fleshy part of the inside of your hand when cooked to medium rare.

 

Remove the meat from the pan and allow to rest on a cutting board for about 3-5 minutes.

 

Slice thinly and divide among the taco shells along with the spicy yogurt sauce, onion radish and cilantro

 

 

Charred favas, mint and ricotta salata
Serves 4 
Total time 15 minutes
 
 
2 Lbs Fava beans, shucked
¼ bunch fresh mint leaves, roughly torn
2 tablespoons flat leaf parsley leaves
1 lemon juiced plus the zest
3 tablespoons of olive oil
Salt 
Fresh ground pepper
3 pieces of prosciutto, rolled and into sliced thin strips
2 ounces of ricotta salata
1 radish sliced thin
 
 
 
Set a large pot of salted water over high heat and bring to a boil. Fill a large bowl with ice and water to refresh the favas.
 
Add the favas to the pot and cook until tender but firm, about 3 minutes. Remove them with a slotted poon and dunk in the ice water. After they have cooled, gently pop them out of their skins and onto a plate.
 
Heat 1 tablespoon of the olive oil over medium and crisp to golden brown. Drain on a paper towel over a plate and reserve for later. 
 
Whisk together the lemon juice, zest and 2 tablespoons of olive oil and set aside
 
Heat the same pan you crisped the prosciutto in over high heat once the pan starts to smoke add all the reserved favas in a single layer on the pan and cook undisturbed until a nice char forms on the outside, about 2 minutes.
 
Remove the favas from the pan and toss with the mint and parsley. Add the dressing very slowly just until the favas and leaves are gently dressed.
 
Arrange on a plate and top with the crisp prosciutto a few radish slices and a healthy amount of grated ricotta salata
 
 
 

 
ZoomInfo

Charred favas, mint and ricotta salata

Serves 4 

Total time 15 minutes

 

 

2 Lbs Fava beans, shucked

¼ bunch fresh mint leaves, roughly torn

2 tablespoons flat leaf parsley leaves

1 lemon juiced plus the zest

3 tablespoons of olive oil

Salt

Fresh ground pepper

3 pieces of prosciutto, rolled and into sliced thin strips

2 ounces of ricotta salata

1 radish sliced thin

 

 

 

Set a large pot of salted water over high heat and bring to a boil. Fill a large bowl with ice and water to refresh the favas.

 

Add the favas to the pot and cook until tender but firm, about 3 minutes. Remove them with a slotted poon and dunk in the ice water. After they have cooled, gently pop them out of their skins and onto a plate.

 

Heat 1 tablespoon of the olive oil over medium and crisp to golden brown. Drain on a paper towel over a plate and reserve for later.

 

Whisk together the lemon juice, zest and 2 tablespoons of olive oil and set aside

 

Heat the same pan you crisped the prosciutto in over high heat once the pan starts to smoke add all the reserved favas in a single layer on the pan and cook undisturbed until a nice char forms on the outside, about 2 minutes.

 

Remove the favas from the pan and toss with the mint and parsley. Add the dressing very slowly just until the favas and leaves are gently dressed.

 

Arrange on a plate and top with the crisp prosciutto a few radish slices and a healthy amount of grated ricotta salata

 

 

 

 

No time to cook breakfast? No problem! 
I love this make ahead breakfast. It’s loaded with energy and will have you out the door in no time.
 
 
Base:
2 Cups rolled oats
2 Cups unsweetened almond milk
½ cup kefir
½ cup dried cherries, roughly chopped
1 banana, grated on a box grater
½ Apple, grated on a box grater
 
Topping:
Raspberries
Blueberries
Strawberries
Chopped hazelnuts and pistachios
 
Combine all the base ingredients together in large bowl. Place in the fridge overnight. Bring it out and top with whichever toppings you prefer.

 
ZoomInfo

No time to cook breakfast? No problem!

I love this make ahead breakfast. It’s loaded with energy and will have you out the door in no time.

 

 

Base:

2 Cups rolled oats

2 Cups unsweetened almond milk

½ cup kefir

½ cup dried cherries, roughly chopped

1 banana, grated on a box grater

½ Apple, grated on a box grater

 

Topping:

Raspberries

Blueberries

Strawberries

Chopped hazelnuts and pistachios

 

Combine all the base ingredients together in large bowl. Place in the fridge overnight. Bring it out and top with whichever toppings you prefer.

 

cookinandshootin:

Check out our first guest on C&S!

We spend a lot of time thinking of recipes and images to share with you on this blog, and sharing food, even if just virtually, is in effect the backbone not only of this blog, but the notion of food in general.

With that in mind, Cookin’ and Shootin’ will start introducing you to the chefs, creatives, and food lovers that inspire us (and sometimes, feed us!).

We start what will hopefully begin a delicious series with Dean Sheremet, fellow FCI graduate (ahem, we both graduated top of the class – just saying), Nobu and Jean-Georges alum, culinary TV presenter, and pal. This end-of-summer biyaldi, layered with vegetables, is a warm, deeply flavored, and robust dish that will bridge the gap between the seasons.

The recipe follows, as do details on where you can find Dean on social media, so be sure to add him to your list of people to follow. Lastly, a little Q&A, based on the ever-entertaining Proust questionnaire.

Cooking background: French Culinary Institute class of 2010, Nobu, Jean-Georges

Currently: TV projects, writing, recipe developing

What is your idea of perfect happiness, were it food? Any meal shared with friends.
And wine.

What is your greatest food fear? (Insert flashback) Not having mise ready at service.

What is the trait you most deplore in yourself as a chef? In the heat of service, I can be very stringent.

What is the trait you most deplore in fellow cooks? Laziness and lack of accountability.

What is your greatest food extravagance? The time I went to the French Laundry, and I wanted to experience everything. I couldn’t turn down the bread, and 21 courses later, I literally felt like I was going to throw up.

What is your favorite food journey? I’m still on it.

On what occasion do you lie in the kitchen? I sometimes gloss over ingredients that I put in food that they may not eat. (Apologies to my vegetarian friends – read: duck fat).

What do you dislike most in a food’s appearance? I hate dead herbs on a plate. Or herbs on the rim of a plate. Actually, just any misguided herbs.

Which living chef do you despise the most? It’s more a quality than a person: Egotism.

What is your greatest food regret? Sending out overcooked salmon. Sorry, table 56.

What or who is the greatest culinary love of your life? Doing prep – it’s when I feel at peace.

When and where were you happiest cooking? Cooking on the line at JG, at a really high level, and cooking without fear.

What is the cooking talent you would most like to have? Patience.

What is your current state of mind? Restless.

If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be? I have a hard time letting go.

If you could change one thing about your family, what would it be? I’d have my grandmother back on this earth.

What do you consider your greatest achievement? Work ethic.

What do you regard as the lowest depth of misery? Working brunch.

What is the quality you most like in a man? Trustworthiness.

What is the quality you most like in a woman? Wit.

What do you most value in your friends? Knowing they have my back no matter what.

Favorite hero of fiction? Sherlock Holmes.

Who are your heroes in real life? My grandmother.

What is it that you most dislike? Ignorance.

How would you like to die? Happy.

What is your motto? Memento mori.

Fun times in the kitchen